Tuesday, July 19, 2022

Travel Tuesday : In Sharp Focus


Some of my early memories include ripe wheat fields.  The five acre field outside my childhood bedroom window was often planted in hard red winter wheat.  The kind milled to make the flour that pasta is made from.  I was disappointed as a child to hear that our wheat was used to make macaroni, and not bread.  Looking at is now, in sharper focus, what we were raising is a premium grain, used to make some of the most wonderful foods of modern cuisine.  

A ripe wheat field is a difficult thing to photograph using a camera with autofocus.   There are so many sharp edges, that the focus is on a linear band, leaving the foreground and distance in a blur. I like this.  Even if it was an accident.  There is a YouTuber that urges photographers to not delete the mistakes, there is gold in them sometimes.  

From a sensory perspective there is the field before harvest, something you should never walk in, trampled wheat is lost wheat, then there is the fresh cut stubble field.  The stalks are left 6-10 inches high, they snap when you walk over them.  The smell stays with you for a lifetime.  The last time I saw a fresh stubble field, was in Normandy one summer.  Probably 100 acres, freshly harvested, the combine was still in the corner of the field.  It was after dinner, but still daylight in mid summer.  And over dinner I had encountered my first bottle of Norman Cider.  I went for a walk in the field, crunch, crunch, crunch, then collapsed in bed for the sleep of delightfully drunk.  The experience stays in sharp focus, the joys of travel.  

13 comments:

  1. Bringing back such sweet memories — for you. I’ve never walked a wheat field.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have walked the streets of many cities

      Delete
  2. The mature wheat waves around in any breeze, making it hard to get a focus. 100 acres of a premium wheat is impressive. It is a wonder you didn't end coming from a rich family.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gentle breezes hopefully, wind can be hard on wheat as it nears maturity

      Delete
  3. I agree that every photo has something of interest that perhaps you didn't see when you clicked it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wheat fields, huh? Tell me, is this where the elusive free-range glutens reside?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lots of them, though this is a lower protein wheat

      Delete
  5. A very poetic post! Enjoyed reading it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some day I will write in rhyme

      Delete
  6. I saw a few wheat fields as a child but where I grew up, corn was king.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More corn than anything else out there

      Delete
  7. My guts are quivering from all that wheat....

    Sassybear
    https://idleeyesandadormy.com/

    ReplyDelete