Saturday, August 01, 2020

I Can See The Goal



I had another entry drafted, and when I went to set it to post, I realized this is the first of August, 2020.  Three years from today, I am eligible to retire.  I can see the goal.  I have already marked the date on my office calendar and marked the months through the end of 2023 with DO NOT SCHEDULE.  

I started working and paying taxes almost 50 years ago (children can work and be paid - and owe taxes - on a family farm - they are exempt from the normal child labor laws.)  I could max out retirement benefits by working an additional five years.  And over the years, being stingy by nature, I thought about that. At one time I joked that they would find me decomposing at my desk someday.  I have crunched the numbers, we will be okay.  I am shy or maybe it is modest, and I don't want to discuss the details of our finances, but if we are reasonable we will be just fine.  Jay is four and half years older than I am.  If I worked until I was 70, he would be nearing 75 when I retired.  Age can bring challenges. There are adventures we want to experience, that require being able to go and do.  We need to do that while we can.  

I keep joking, that it is not that I am counting or anything, but I am counting.  I have been very public in my office about my intended retirement date.  I know it could interfere with promotions or project assignments, but I want them to know there is a limit on how long I intend to be there. I actually had that discussion with someone about a promotion recently and said, "if I did, it would only be for three years, we need to bring into the picture the person who would replace me when I retire so they are up to speed and ready to go."  (Not an exact quote, I named names.)

Did you plan for a target retirement date, or are you planning for one, or are you expecting that they will find you decomposing at your desk one day?  

24 comments:

  1. There is another one of the sculptures by Patrick and Anne Poinier I believe.

    Oh retirement...I have a long way to go yet....

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  2. I recommend retirement. I did so last year at 62. My partner a few years earlier when he was 65. The three years will pass quickly, but do you really have to wait that long?

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    1. Health Insurance is why I need to wait. We are years behind the rest of thed on providing access health care.

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    2. I see. Well, Obama did try and made some improvements.

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  3. no retirement plans for me, but then you knew that already. keep your eyes on the prize.

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  4. No plans for me, either,because I really like my current job and I enjoy working.

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    1. At times I feel like that, and then

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  5. Yes, I planned for a target early-retirement date. The day I retired was the happiest day of my life.

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  6. I read the title as I Can See The Goat, so my brain went on the fritz!

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  7. I didn't plan to retire when I did at the age of 58 back in 2008, but a horrible new principal at my school for my last five years had contributed to my declining health and MS issues. As I stood at the podium at assembly to hand out Reading awards to 7th and 8th graders on the last day of school, I said that this would be my last time to do this because I had left a letter of my retirement announcement on the principal's desk on my way down to the auditorium from my library right before the assembly. She had not seen it yet!

    Everyone was caught off guard. I had already had the OK from the school corporation's financial officer to resign so late in the in the school year. I stayed on after the kids left for the year to finish up projects, ordering, etc., and my last day was July 1, 2008. It was the best thing I ever did. Four months after that, I was okayed for social security disability due to MS, so I had full social security benefits seven years before 65. I was automatically placed on Medicare after two years on SS. So, that is my way too long story. Thanks for the opportunity to remember something I haven't thought about for years.

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    1. If not for needing to wait for Medicare, I'd do it sooner.

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  8. I guess you might say that I never retired but, I actually did. I worked in banking most of my career. When I retired, I still needed something to do so I started working part time for a non-profit organization. I like it. It keeps my brain sharp and gives me extra travel money.

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    1. I won't say, I won't do part time flexible work after retiring. I want flexibility to travel, and more time to do things I want to do. There are parts of my work I love, and would enjoy continuing to do.

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    2. Sharon is right. My mother retired and then turned around and got a part time job. She said key is to stay alert and active, and not sit about the house. That is the downfall. Most of her friends are the same age, and almost all of them are either dead, or in poor health. Sad considering none of them were over 81.

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  9. SG's grandfather retired at 56 and always told his grandchildren to retire and enjoy life as young as they could. He said the extra income wasn't worth the wait. He lived to 90 and had an incredible second act. I retired at 57. Would have more money now, but I wouldn't change anything.

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    1. My parents retired in their 50’s, the first time

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  10. We have been planning for retirement for most of our career, and I've been counting down for the last 10 years, when I started hating my job. I have 5 years and 10 months to go, and will walk out the door day I turn 55 in May of 2026 (or within days of that, as soon as practicable.) I am miserable in my career. It impacts my mental and physical health, but I have to be 55 to claim my retirement benefits. It will definitely be the one of the happiest days of my life. While I'm not planning to work after retirement,(I have plenty of hobbies and non-work plans) if I found something I loved doing, I'd do it.

    Sassybear
    www.idleeyesandadormy.com

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    1. You are so young, my father was 57 when he retired the first time, 62 the second time.

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  11. Someone has assured me it is nearly impossible to retire for so many reasons that it isn't worth thinking about it. I am likely to die prior to any realization of such.

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